Chromascape156 The Valley

The Colorist Landscape

The Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts
19805 W. Capitol Dr. Brookfield, WI

Wednesdays, July 13 – August 3, 6-8pm

A colorist is someone who uses contracts of color to describe objects in painting, rather than value. This class will cover both landscape painting and color. Using bright, expressive palettes, students will create their own landscape paintings.
Cost: $60 ($50 for donors)
Cost includes four sessions; does not include supplies. 

Chromascape242 Farm Country

New Methods in Acrylic Painting

Saturday, June 18, 10am- 2:30pm

The Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts
19805 W. Capitol Drive Brookfield, WI

Learn how to create a strong painting using acrylic painting in both traditional and nontraditional ways in this exciting workshop! Layering, carving, drawing, mark making, mixed media, knife painting, and much more will be covered.
Cost: $35 ($30 for donors)
Cost does not include supplies. Please pack a lunch for a 30-minute break. 

Chromascape228 Cherished Yellow

Expressive Landscapes in Acrylic

Held at the Peninsula School of Art in Fish Creek, WI

August 12 & 13, 9am-4pm

This workshop focuses on the exploration and development of your approach to landscape painting. An emphasis will be placed on investigation and problem solving, resulting in compositions that are expressive, fresh, and visually interesting.

School Information:

With instruction in all fine art media, at all skill levels, Peninsula School of Art has brought excellence to art education for 50 years. Nationally recognized artist educators lead workshops in our light-filled, spacious studios, nestled in the inspirational beauty of Door County, Wisconsin. Join us this summer for transformative workshops in our supportive and intimate setting.

For more information or to register please visit the Peninsula School of Art’s website

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Taking a Break from Classes

If you have been following my classes you may have noticed me slowing down a bit. With the holidays, a toddler at home, and another child expected in February, I have my hands full right now. Please check back in the spring! If you would like to receive emails from me about my classes when they resume please shoot me an email and let me know! (bekiborman@gmail.com)

Thank you and Happy Holidays!

Beki

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Thoughts on Process

 

I recently taught a class, “Painting by Process” at the Cedarburg Cultural Center. The purpose of the class was to take students step by step through planning and execution. Often my students ask me in such classes, “Do you really work this way?” The truth is no, but I should. The class involves composition studies and value studies on the first day. The second day we do a study focusing on color. The last two sessions are spent executing a larger final painting. Each day also involves journaling with prompt questions. While this is not the only way to work- it is a beneficial one. Not all people are planners. I know I am not (at least when it comes to painting). Many painters are spontaneous and in the moment and I think that is important too. But at least once and a while it is important to slow down and plan. Even if it does not result in a masterpiece. The process will force you to think more critically about your art and that habit will carry over even when not intentionally utilized.

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Brushes

I am frequently asked about brushes. When I am teaching brushes are a fundamental component of painting but I use them in my studio rarely. I think many artists, especially those just beginning their painting journey, think that there is a perfect brush for every task. I tend to think that you can make most brushes do what you need (with a few exceptions). So I tend to not spend much time worrying about what number or hair type I have. Of course softer brushes are better for thin applications and blending, and stiff brushes are better for thick paint and texture. Big brushes are better for washes and small ones are better for detail. But I can get a filbert and a round to make pretty much the same marks, and a flat brush makes great lines. So there is a lot of overlap. You don’t need dozens of brushes. But maybe that’s just me. I work mostly with knives anyway. When I do use a brush, my all purpose favorite is a medium soft synthetic flat. Here are a few examples of my most used brushes (when I use brushes at all).