Experimental Acrylic Painting

At the Cedarburg Cultural Center

Wednesdays, Nov. 29- Dec. 20, 6:30-8:30pm

This class will focus on using acrylic painting in both traditional and non-traditional ways to create a strong painting. Layering, carving, drawing, washes, mark-making, mixed media, brushstroke, and much more will be covered. We will experiment with the materials and application. This is a great opportunity to take acrylic painting to the next level. Some experience is helpful but beginners are welcome!

Supply List on CCC website. $ 126 CCC Members/ $ 158 Non-Members

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Ugly Stages

This image is from last Tuesday’s abstract painting class at the Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts. The image on the left was the quick expressive first layer. I was reacting to the colors and shapes from a random magazine ad. The image on the right is the second layer which incorporates different techniques such as masking, rollers, and dripping. I found the result particularly interesting because I like the first painting and then I “messed it up” for the sake of demonstrating techniques. However, I also found this to be a good opportunity to talk about the ugly stages in painting. Often there are moments when you will like a painting and moments when you will hate it. Of course the goal is to come out on the side of like. Yet, the more I look at the painting I ended up with the more I like it anyways!

Thoughts on Process

 

I recently taught a class, “Painting by Process” at the Cedarburg Cultural Center. The purpose of the class was to take students step by step through planning and execution. Often my students ask me in such classes, “Do you really work this way?” The truth is no, but I should. The class involves composition studies and value studies on the first day. The second day we do a study focusing on color. The last two sessions are spent executing a larger final painting. Each day also involves journaling with prompt questions. While this is not the only way to work- it is a beneficial one. Not all people are planners. I know I am not (at least when it comes to painting). Many painters are spontaneous and in the moment and I think that is important too. But at least once and a while it is important to slow down and plan. Even if it does not result in a masterpiece. The process will force you to think more critically about your art and that habit will carry over even when not intentionally utilized.